Monday, May 21, 2007

It’s funny how certain things, seemingly unrelated, have such impact on life. I started blogging about my garden and other personal experiences after getting inspired to do the same by some absolutely stunning garden blogs existing on the web. It’s a great feeling to see the beautiful gardens all over the world, to be able to experience the diverse flora across geographical boundaries, in places, I couldn’t have ever dreamt of visiting. Strangely enough all these experiences have made me more conscious and responsible towards my garden. Looking at the garden thoughtfully I felt a reverence towards the senior most members of my floral family. The Peepal tree(Ficus religiosa), the pride of my garden, having its sagely existence much before mine, stands tall and is a witness to several decades of changes this place has seen.Every spring a significant part of the garden is bathed in its dry leaves, giving nightmares to my sweeper. This time I collected the leaves and allowed them to decay, creating good enough compost. Here it sways its sturdy branches adorned in a brand new set of leaves, smiling in the face of a harsh summer and providing the much needed shade to this portion of the house. Another portion of the house is flanked by the relatively younger Mango tree. Mango( Mangifera Indica)being one of my favorite fruits and also the national fruit of my country gives the tree a very special place in my heart. Although it is still not exactly like a fully grown mango tree but it does bear some delicious fruit leaving my heart craving for more.Sadly this season the mangoes are conspicuous by their absence ,for reasons unknown to me. This Mango tree ,teeming with fruits, is in my neighbours' yard.Simply awesome!! Adjacent to the mango stands the pomegranate tree, nowhere as sturdy as the Peepal or as glamorous as the mango, pomegranate or Punica granatum, has a beauty surpassed by no other. Standing tall and slender with delicately hanging branches it seems like a compromise between the strength of a big tree and the grace of a small flowering plant. This is the Java Plum or the Jamun tree as is known in Hindi.Also known as Indian Blackberry,the tree bears fruit in the months of July-August This is the Ashoka tree or the Indian Fir or the Mast tree.The majestically tall tree is almost always covered with dense foliage. Shedding of leaves occur at the onset of spring,just like the Peepal tree.My garden has about twenty of these trees. That’s the Guava tree, a favorite of the birds who frequent here, especially parrots. Intrigue and admiration for these flying visitors preempts any irritation I might have had on finding the fruits of my labor pecked. Looking down upon the garden, quite literally, is the Eucalyptus. It’s a favored hang out for the Eagles, may be they get a better view from this high up without having to bother themselves with the effort of flying! Although the Eagles are a menace, for all the organic freebies they drop in the garden, yet their prying eyes keeps the garden free of small rodents and other squirming creatures. The tree emits a particularly pleasing odor. In fact many of the medicinal concoctions for local pain relief have eucalyptus oil as an essential component and emit that slightly pungent odor so typical of eucalyptus.

12 comments:

Carol said...

You have some wonderful trees, none of which would grow where I live. The world is indeed diverse!

Thalia said...

Oh I love fruiting trees! There are so many childhood memories have been associated with all the trees that you have listed out here!I am so glad to see your garden have almost all of my favourite trees!:-)

Nicole said...

Very lovely trees, I agree with you on the eucalyptus fragrance.
Once I got some fresh eucalyptus leaves in the market and I used them for a most fragrant and refreshing “spa” foot bath-chop up a handful of leaves and add them to hot water in your foot bath, add essential oil or, bath salts or whatever you like to soak your feet in, slip feet in, sit back and relax.

Nicole said...

Re the eagles I suppose you know that bird droppings are fantastic manure for roses.

Tyra said...

The Peepal tree, absolutele wonderful I understand that you love it. Old trees have a special kind of impressiveness. I will show you my old trees in my next post...
I planted an Eucalyptus this year and that is very exotic here! I have to keep it indoors during the winter....so you see I´ve got a problem in a few years. Have to build a new house :-)

Nicole said...

Chancy form the garden club in trinidad notes on your blog on the garden of the five sense "The plant you refer to as a mini chandelier comes from Africa and is called dombeya."

exile61 said...

Your trees are wonderful. I cannot believe you have a Mango tree in your garden! That is one of my favourite fruits as well. Best wishes from Germany, Andrea

Yolanda Elizabet said...

What a lot of lovely trees you have in your garden. I'm glad to see that you love your trees, just as I do.

It's not fair is it, that your neighbour's tree has all those lovely mangos whereas your tree has none this year. Nevermind, there will always be next year!

Layanee said...

You have expressed exactly my sentiments on blogs. It is a great way to travel. Love the information on the trees in your area.

Annie in Austin said...

Thank you GreenThumb for the tour of your trees. I'll bet we've seen these varieties in the background of movies or TV shows, but had no guide to identify them for us until now!

The only one that grows in my garden is the pomegranate tree - mine hasn't made a single flower, but maybe it will look like yours one day~

Annie at the Transplantable Rose

guild_rez said...

A garden without trees scarcely deserves to be called a garden.

Your trees in your county are just beautiful,
cheers from Canada

Sazji said...

I envy you from afar for being able to have guavas and mangos. even if it is the neighbor's...there must be significant extras. :) Here the mulberry glut is beginning, and then we'll have more figs than we know what to do with. I wish we could trade!

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