Wednesday, July 4, 2007

Monsoon Mania

Welcome rains! It seems that the worst is over. The place has been blessed with some wonder showers bringing the temperatures significantly down. There are very few sights more appealing than the sight of gray fluffy clouds, pregnant with water, looming on the horizon, especially after a scorching month of June. My little daughter could appreciate that as she was overjoyed to see the rains and decided to experience the wonder of nature first hand. There is a magical hypnotism in the face of a child. The thrill I had, to see her enjoy the rains, was almost unparalleled in magnitude. And then the rains stopped but this ‘Rain lily’ or Zephyranthes blooms as a memento of the first rains and with a promise of more in store! The change can be appreciated in the long stretches of green. All the leaves and grass which had turned yellow, scorched and parched, are now turning to a shade of soothing green. Its almost miraculous, the effect few good showers can have on the flora. The vitality is palpable. There is an air of freshness, an invigorated look about the whole garden. The leaves and the flowers carry such a washed and clean appearance. The whole garden gives a happy and grateful look!Here, the Plumeria presents a pretty picture:- The inevitable accompaniments of heat and humidity, these mushrooms grew, uninvited, in a corner (They don’t give an appetizing look, do they?). I hope, someday I’ll come across a black or white (Alba) Truffle, growing in my garden. Keep your fingers crossed, it just might happen! The huge leaves of colocasia attained these mega proportions in just two days post rains! I don’t know whether there is a scientific rationale behind it, but no amount of irrigation can match the beneficial effect of rains on the growth of plants.

14 comments:

Matron said...

How wonderful! I have found a garden blogger in India! Isn't the internet amazing? I envy you being able to grow Plumeria. I would be interested to find out if you grow edible fruit and vegetables in your garden. Is that last picture of yams?

Andrea's Garden said...

hello, good to see a new post of yours. I have seen on the telly over here that the rains have caused flooding in your country. Did you have any where you live? Your garden looks very luscious after the rains, just beautiful. Greetings, Andrea

Iowa Gardening Woman said...

Your daughter looks as if she is having a wonderful time. Your plumeria is beautiful also, almost as beautiful as your daughter!

ginger said...

It seems that the appreciation of rain lives! Love the pictures of your daughter frolicking in the rain! The wonder of a child is a precious gift. I'm glad you're seeing green! I love green!

Layanee said...

Green thumb: Sometimes, I am ginger!

Nicole said...

Those first few images of the rain are wonderful-very atmospheric.How lucky is your lovely daughter, to have this garden wonderland to play in and explore, she looks like she enjoys.
Those colocasia leaves look lovely-is this an edible variety? In Trinidad we cook several edible varieties-leaves and tubers-including curried tubers (called eddoes)and pigeon peas. We have 3 types of edible tubers in the Caribbean- tannia ( my favourite), eddoes and dasheen.

Annie in Austin said...

You really captured the way it feels when a long, hot, dry spell is broken by a storm... don't you almost feel giddy with delight once the air changes, Green thumb?

It's great to see your daughter enjoying the rain~

Annie at the Transplantable Rose

kate said...

Your daughter looks so adorable as she explores the rain ... what a sweetie she is!

I've often wondered why it is that a rain brings the garden alive in a way that watering simply doesn't accomplish. It is so obvious when I see the growth of the Colacasia. Those are amazing.

And then there are the mushrooms. I hope some truffles spring up in your garden one day.

Here's to less high temperatures for you and more rain!

Wicked Gardener said...

What are those tall skinny trees? Include more garden shots! Your drive is beautiful!

Libbys Blog said...

I found you through 'Our Little corner of Paradise' and loved al your plants, I try and grow some 'Exotic Jungle types' in my garden and chuckled when I saw your Colocasia's as these are a favourite of mine!

A wildlife gardener said...

How wonderful to have the rain bring your garden to life and to experience the wonder of it all through the innocent eyes of your beautiful daughter.

I have recommended you for a new award called Bloggers For Positive Global Change. The details are on my 10 July post.

Green thumb said...

Matron: hi and welcome! internet is really amazing. I do grow edible fruits and veggies, will post pics of my veggie garden shortly.The last picture is of Colocasia. Yam is actually the common name for some species in the genus Dioscorea grown for their starchy tubers. These are perennial herbaceous vines , whereas Colocasia are upright plants with large leaves, commonly known as Elephant ears.
Dear Andrea, India's is such a big country that you have drought and floods existing together, but, I am having neither of that in my part. Here the weather Gods seem confused, at times it pours and then days pass by without clouds making an appearance. Officially it is the rainy season!
Welcome Iowa gardening woman and Layanee! Thanks for your nice words.
Nicole: this is indeed an edible variety of colocasia growing in my kitchen garden. It will be ready for consumption in about a month time.
Dear Annie, its pure ecstasy to have thundershowers after hot dry spell and icing on the cake is to see my little one gettting drenched.
Thanks dear Kate, you are ever so kind with your words.
Those tall trees are Eucalyptus trees, dear Wicked gardener.
Welcome Libby's blog! I've seen your elephant ear collection on your blog.Its truly amazing. your Brugmansia look great too.
Thanks dear Wild life gardener for recommending me for Bloggers For Positive Global Change.It feels great.

Anonymous said...

Hello there

hv been going thru yr garden blogs and really enjoying it, as i stay in a gulf country its a treat for me seeing such array of flowers amazing, though i do have my own small garden in my balcony of which i take utmost care Keep up !!!

Anonymous said...

Hi, It was great to see your blog. I grew up in Ghaziabad ,not far from Saharanpur. I am a female physician,work and live in USA but I came across your blog when searching for Plumerias in India.You have a beautiful garden and your daughter appears very happy. May be someday I get to meet you on my India trip.

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